[Blogging Mindset] Your First Thousand Blog Posts (Are Your Worst)

“Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.” Henri Cartier-Bresson

Okay, maybe ten thousand blog posts is a more difficult milestone than taking ten thousand photographs, so let’s say that your first thousand blog posts are going to be your worst.

Write this down, read it out loud until you internalize it. Why? Because odds are that you are not as patient as you should be, that you have some unrealistic expectations that might end up breaking your own heart.

Every day I receive comments and e-mails from folks who are ready to give up: they’ve tried it all, and it’s not working. It’s not fair. They’ve come too late to the party; they’re not lucky enough.

Well… they’ve only been blogging for a few months, and they’re ready to throw in the towel.

The truth you’d much rather ignore is that most of us are not brilliant bloggers in our early days. I look back at some of the posts I wrote in my first year of blogging and shudder with embarrassment.

It’s all about the mistakes.

We learn how to do something by doing it wrong over and over again. This is how the learning process works.

With each mistake and failure comes a lesson, with every post you write a new skill, and with each experiment a technique that might work for you better than all the others.

And, yes, it does feel like you’re not making any progress. And, yes, that cliche about the iceberg and all that is true. You are slowly developing skills you’re not even aware of, you are building trust with your readers, you are developing a subconscious understanding of what is it that your audience wants to read and how to best write it into existence.


The first thousand blog posts are your worst. Do not get discouraged by this gap between what (and how) you want to blog, and what your articles end up looking like.

Work twice as hard on closing this gap. Constantly challenge yourself, and realize that it’s called a learning curve because it’s an uphill battle.

And it’s up to you if you want to climb all the way to the top or not.

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50 thoughts on “[Blogging Mindset] Your First Thousand Blog Posts (Are Your Worst)

  1. I needed this. I’ve started, restarted, and deleted many of my older entries across multiple sites. Now I wish I had kept them just to go back and see if I have actually improved. This is exactly what I needed. Thank you so much for this!

    Liked by 4 people

  2. I used to hate hearing things like this because I am so impatient, but it’s true. I make YouTube videos and when I look back on my old ones they make me cringe. I don’t have enough energy. My lighting is bad. The angles are weird. Everything. Overtime, I learned what needed to be fixed through watching other youtubers and studying the art of it. Reading this post I see that the same goes for blogging.

    Liked by 6 people

  3. I have to be honest with you, Christian. Although I want people to like and follow my blog, thousands of likes and followers would scare me to death! My main goal in blogging is to write from the bottom of my soul in hopes of reaching someone else and learning as I go. Thank you again for your never-ending encouragement.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Hi Sandi,

      That’s why overnight success rarely exists, and it’s never good. You need to build up your emotional resilience, to appreciate the hard work that you put so you could get there.

      If you were teleported to the top of the mountain, you’d have no appreciation for the climb.

      Liked by 6 people

  4. Thank you so much. I really needed to hear this. A tendency of mine for a lot of things I do…so it’s tough love for me but very necessary if I want to accomplish anything. It’s a completely different mind set 🙌🏼

    Liked by 3 people

  5. 1000 blog posts may seem daunting to some, but for me it’s encouraging. I’ve only been blogging for 2 months with 43 posts so far. Your post reminds me that 2 months in is way too soon to get discouraged. I realize that I need to continue to write, work hard to improve the quality of my content and increase engagement. In the meantime I can continue to work on promoting my blog by leveraging social media. This is something I would do for free, so the possibility of monetizing in the future is just icing on the cake.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Two months is way too soon to get discouraged. If you keep going, then the learning curve stops being so steep, and you develop skills you never even knew you needed.

      This game requires at least one year of being committed and focused.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Exactly! And I’m having a good time in the process, so I’m not short on patience. I’ll just keep chugging along and checking your blog for helpful tips and encouragement.

        Liked by 2 people

  6. This is just too good to be true…I haven’t written 1,000 posts yet but have written hundreds so to speak. I agree with you. The first 1,000 posts will most likely be the worst! After that, who knows! Maybe they’ll get better overtime!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Yes, totally agree with this. I look back at my first blog posts and think, “Ugh, not great”, partly because I was new to blogging and editing but also because, at the time, I didn’t think my blog would run for so long. I thought that perhaps 20 or so friends would follow for 6 months before it fizzled out, so I wasn’t so fussy about the content. Can’t believe I am still writing 4 years later, and that people want to read about the exploits of a silly French cat!

    Liked by 2 people

  8. I just heard a business coach speak on something similar about us comparing our first efforts to another who has years of practice and experience. This is so true, it is our work in progress always as we develop. I have learned based on comments what is most important in my blogs and even social media posts that I test using content. I have learned that everyone will not read the information that I am passionate about but the ones who do have the same interests. I am learning to pay closer attention to writing style but also not doing so in a way that changes me being my organic self. Most important, I am learning that my standards of perfection do not exist, this allows me to keep working and appreciate growth. Great post!

    Like

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