How to Stop Being “The Invisible Blogger”

Have you ever felt like the invisible blogger?

You work hard on your posts, pouring every ounce of emotion, creativity, and insight you have into them. You select the best photos and graphics to go with them, submit your blogs to various outlets, share them on social media, do your best to network with fellow bloggers.

But it’s like no one even sees you.

Other bloggers ignore you, your social media pages resemble barren wastelands. None of the few people who do visit your leave you a comment, telling you to keep going, to thank you for doing such a great job.

It’s like you’re invisible… and you wonder if there’s anything you can do about it.

Well, the good news is, yes, of course there’s something you can do about it. And this post is going to do just that: provide you with tips and tactics that will have you reaching new highs in terms of traffic and engagement.

Do not be boring

What is it that makes our education system to be considered so boring?

As a matter of fact, very few teenagers like to go to school. They’d rather be doing just about anything else, and it’s not because they’re lazy, but because school is both overwhelming and boring.

You’re forced to spend the entire day learning stuff you couldn’t care less about.

Are you the teacher? Are you one of those teachers that no one ever liked?

Yes, it’s information that people want. And not just valuable information, but presented in such a way that is also considered entertainment.

It’s fun and informative. That’s what most people would say about their favorite blog.

Now, be honest. Are you the teacher? Are you a bit too serious? All work and no play? Are you forcing us to read thousands of words of information we don’t want to know about?

Why do people read blogs?

People read blogs for a lot of reasons, but it mostly comes down to three main reasons:

  1. To be informed: they want to know stuff, to learn a particular skill, to gain insight.
  2. To be entertained: they want to smile or laugh; to feel something. Emotions are at the foundation of 99.99% of what we do in our day to day lives
  3. To connect: they want to find like-minded individuals and network with them, to share ideas and thoughts and experiences.

But there’s also a fourth reason: blogs are a form of escape. Something to avoid boredom, an excuse to procrastinate, to forget about the fact that we are adults for a while.

After all, how many of you are reading this post from your workplace? Aren’t you supposed to be working?

A great blog provides all of it: allows us to avoid the responsibilities of adult life, while learning a thing or two, laughing at some witty remark, and being able to discuss our thoughts on different topics with other people.

Why are you invisible?

Most likely, because you think that you’re supposed to become a teacher, when in reality, that’s just a small part of being a blogger.

Your main job is to capture your reader’s attention, and to do that, you need to entertain them, to make them feel something.

That’s why writing about what you’re passionate about is crucial.

Think of it this way: what are the people you’re most drawn to? Friendly? Free? Funny? Passionate?

Why wouldn’t it be the same in the world of blogging?

I know, I know, it’s not easy to do so. I often get sidetracked myself, assuming the role of teacher, and becoming this grumpy old man who’s all business and no fun. It happens.

For instance, there’s this post: The Ultimate Guide to Blogging. Lots of effort, time, and mental energy put into it. Yet it didn’t get much attention.

It’s supposed to be a condensed version of what to do to be great at blogging, yet few people read it.

There’s a lot of valuable information, yet there are a lot of other posts that have done a lot better, for instance 9 Mistakes that Will Screw Up Your Blog. Thousands of people have read it in the first few days.

If you’re just starting out, you’ll find this a bit depressing. You’ll never be able to predict which posts will be popular, because sometimes you forget that you’re not a teacher, but rather an interesting diversion.

Take the fun out of your posts, and it will be as if you didn’t even write them.

How to stop being invisible

Write what your readers want to read. Simple.

I know it’s a difficult truth to accept. And it’s paradoxical. You should write what you want, write like yourself, write what you love, yet…

You need to find a common denominator and also write what people want to read.

If you want to be a successful blogger, you need to find the overlap between what you want to write and what the people want to read. It’s a process every writer goes through, and you’re no different.

Accept that you have to add value. There’s no way around it, and the day you stop providing value is the day they stop reading.

So figure out what is it that your readers want, and give it to them in an fun and interesting way.

108 thoughts on “How to Stop Being “The Invisible Blogger”

  1. Thank you so much for this. It really taught me a lot and now I have a direction to go with in my blog to kinda try to figure out how to incorporate these into every blog post and to see which posts get more likes and do more posts like them. Thanks again!

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Great post as always. I always find myself trying to figure out ways to shed this invisibility cloak of mine. It’s not always an easy thing to do. But I guess if it were we’d all be successful bloggers.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you, Kiyana.

      One thing is to do what the vast majority of bloggers don’t do. Well, most of them quit when things get hard, never learn, never improve, never figure out who their target audience is, or how to reach that audience.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. What you say makes perfect sense, and it is hard to strike a balance sometimes: writing what people like to read and yet still writing about what I want to talk about. That’s pretty much my biggest blogging challenge so far. Trying to balance those two.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. What would you say to blogs that are dedicated to niche audiences?

    For example, I have an environment blog. While I would like nonspecialists to visit, I write primarily for students who need this information as a valuable resource. The style of writing for both is very different.

    Do I simply have to accept that I may never have a viral blog? Do I change my target audience in search of people who appreciate the work?

    Or do I continue doing what I do and alternate between both forms of writing?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. 1. Write what you want.
      2. Write how you want.
      3. Write in such a way that as many people as possible can understand you.
      4. Do not sell your soul for more readers.
      5. Try to always become better at sharing ideas and notions in the most efficient way possible.
      6. The best in any niche is extremely successful anyways. The bottom is always overcrowded.

      Liked by 2 people

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