[Blogging Mindset] A Balancing Act

The first rule of writing anything worth reading?

Write what you want.

Write what you know.

Write about stuff that sets your soul on fire.

No matter how you word it, the truth is that one should write about the stuff they’re passionate about.

But…

There are at least a dozen articles on this blog alone that urge you to always think of the reader, and what such person might want to read from you.

So, what is one supposed to do?

Read on to find out.

  1. If you’re a just starting out – Don’t worry about readers!

The rule of thumb is to write about the stuff you’re passionate about. Find your fire. Write about it.

Find your voice, write in such a way that words flow effortlessly. It’s no longer a thing of inspiration, but rather of doing the hard work that is required to produce the articles you wish to release into the world.

The beginner tends to obsess about readers – what if they don’t like their stuff, if they comment some rude remarks?

Oh my, what if everyone currently inhabiting this planet will be hating your blog posts?

The truth is, that when just starting out, the biggest issue is to find someone, anyone willing to read your stuff.

It’s not negative feedback that makes 90% of bloggers to quit, but lack of feedback.

That being said, if you’re just starting out, you just write. Figure out what is it that you care deeply about, and write, write, write.

While readers find (and read or not) your posts, you just focus on producing more content.

Focus on the work. On the words.

Write, write, write.

Punch the damn keys…

2. But after a while…

No matter the topic of your blog, there’s a certain demographic that will love it.

Those people want to read about certain topics within your chosen niche, they want to read content written in a certain way.

Now it gets kind of tricky.

You still get to write about what you want. The what is entirely up to you.

What belongs to your reader is the how.

That’s what it means to write for an audience. You write what you want, but in a way that your readers get to understand and feel and do what you want them to do.

Kinda like being charismatic in real life. Or close enough.

Think about it.

If you want to teach people a certain skill, then you must explain it in ways that they can understand.

The first time you went to school, they weren’t teaching you quantum mechanics or stuff like that.

This is the balancing act. This is the difficult part of blogging.


You know how writing fails?

The writer sets out to prove something to themselves. Or to someone else. They write something to impress someone else. Or to change some opinion.

Pretty words that mean nothing are never pretty upon a closer look.

The best writing is just a feeling that the writer feels. They feel it deep within their own being. Whether it’s love or heartbreak, passion, hate, fear, the desire to break free or break something, whatever it is, they write about it with the sole intent that some other human being can feel what they feel and understand them.

So, yeah, it’s as simple as this:

You write what you want, because of what you feel inside, and moved by this feeling, you work on translating it in such a way that another human being can feel exactly what you’re feeling.

P.S. Teaching someone a certain skill is never about learning stuff, but more about them becoming the kind of person who has the inner confidence to do those things: it’s not about what we get/learn, but about who we become. So that’s also a feeling that moves from the writer to the reader.

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31 thoughts on “[Blogging Mindset] A Balancing Act

    1. Focusing on followers is a rather bad tactic. As all metrics that aren’t in your control. But writing stuff you’re proud of? That’s entirely up to you.

      I guess what I am trying to say is that we should define success based on what is in our control.

      Liked by 3 people

  1. Awesome post! “You write what you want, because of what you feel inside, and moved by this feeling, you work on translating it in such a way that another human being can feel exactly what you’re feeling.” Great point. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Lots of good reminders here, Cristian. I think I’ve read most of these from you before, but with fresh eyes, the one that caught my attention today is: “it’s about them becoming the kind of person who has the inner confidence to do those things.” I am thinking of my grandson who returned to Switzerland after 6 months with us and 4 months in the Job Corps. More than the skills he learned (he was studying heavy equipment mechanics), what he gained that will serve him most is the inner strength to do those things … We can’t control that in someone else, but we can speak to it and foster it and hope to feed it and develop it in ourselves daily. You always give me something to ponder and act upon. Thank you! 👍🏽

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  3. Yes. In a way it sort of ties into your authetisity as well. If you’re writing something to sell or trick someone, it is more difficult for the reader to connect and trust you to help them. Writing as someone who is passionately giving solutions to problems makes you relatable and like you actually care about people.

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  4. Thank you for reminding me of this one “The best writing is just a feeling that the writer feels. They feel it deep within their own being.”. This must be your mantra that’s why you are a very successful blogger. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Really good read! In the beginning it’s hard to gather that outside interest, but you’re right you just have to keep going as you’ll find someone, somewhere will be interested in what your writing and hopefully be inspired and inspire you to carry on! 😉

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