These Ten Tips Are All You Need to Be Successful as a Blogger

Most of the advice that you find on this blog, on our patreon, in my book, it’s all simple, straightforward, and what you’d call common sense.

That’s maybe why a reader e-mailed me yesterday that my posts did not provide him with answers to what he’d been thinking about for so long:

  • How long does a blog post have to be? My answer, which is “it depends, did not satisfy him.
  • How often should he blog? Well, I provide the same answer.
  • How much time does it take to make money from your blog? Guess what I have to say about that.

It all depends.

It’s not magic, but the ingredients that make a successful blog are so obvious that most people think it’s impossible to be that simple.

It is. But simple doesn’t mean easy. Quite the contrary.

Because the truth is that if you work out every single day for an hour, you’ll have an amazing physique. No matter how you train. Just showing up will be enough to change your body. I know because this is what I’ve been doing…

The same goes for blogging. These simple, straightforward, and common sense tips can improve your blogging a lot. But you’ve got to apply them.

  1. Work first on your headlines. Don’t just write down any boring headline that announces your purpose, but brainstorm until you come up with a few interesting or puzzling or engaging headlines, and then choose the best one.
  2. You’re not the center of the universe. With over a hundred million other blogs to choose from, you need to be aware of the fact that if someone does not like something about your blog, they can leave and never come back. Do your best to make your blog posts as exciting and engaging as possible.
  3. You don’t have to say everything at once. You can add a new idea every day. Slowly. Patiently.
  4. Gimmicks, shortcuts, they never last. If you’re going to blog successfully for months or years, sooner or later you need to actually say something, and do it with some style.
  5. Don’t be afraid of listsPeople really like lists.
  6. Punch those damn keys. Waiting for perfect is the worst blogging strategy.
  7. Write the truth. Your truth. Don’t hide it, don’t embellish it.
  8. Be the digital equivalent of a decent human being. 
  9. Never, ever, ever forget that those numbers that you see in your dashboard are actual humans. Just like you. Just like me. Don’t break hearts because you are too busy obsessing about traffic, SEO, and monetizing your blog.
  10. Blogging is hard work. If you’re not where you want to be, work harder.

I know that some of you will think this is not enough. That there’s more to blogging that this.

That this is some washed up version of a much, much bigger and more complex set of rules, guidelines, and…

We are not robots.

That’s why this blog is called The Art of Blogging. There’s an art to blogging. And art is all about making us feel.

What does your blog make you feel like? What do you feel when writing a new article, or replying to a comment, or interacting with a fellow blogger?

Advertisements

30 thoughts on “These Ten Tips Are All You Need to Be Successful as a Blogger

  1. Thank you for sharing this advice! I especially agree with point number four—short cuts never work out in the long term. Consistency plus time will lead to success.

    I will be reblogging this on my site and hopefully even more people will see your best practices and take then to heart. 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Little by little, inch by inch!
    By the yard, it’s hard, by the inch, what a cinch!

    Thanks for reminding me of this.

    Do you work one hour per day, or more? I notice you post every day.

    And maybe you don’t follow all the SEO rules—all those headlines and sub headlines! I’m asking, because it appears that you don’t follow them, but still run a successful blog.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I work some 12-14 hours every day. Depends. But I work on multiple blogs, multiple project, multiple books at a time.

      Also, I don’t believe in SEO. It’s in no way a substitute for writing great content, meant to be read by actual human beings.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I think this is difficult to do. Most start blogging with the goal to be like some extremely popular (and talented) blogger who’s been doing this since 2006, and they want it in two weeks. Being realistic sometimes feels like having to cut down your own wings.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. My question, why do I get likes, but no comments. I don’t know is this or bad? I’d like to know what they liked about or disliked in my writing. I have posted that I’m open to criticism or critique, still nada. Should I just be happy they hit the like star? I’m confused or is this normal?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. For a blog post to get comments it must be engaging. It must make people feel strongly, whether they agree or disagree. It’s not enough to ask them to comment. Also, if you’re not getting comments, it probably means your writing is still not at a high enough level.

      Like

  4. I once analyzed posts from three blogs. In total they had over 13,800 followers. But the three posts in total had only 600 likes. But what surprised me most was that there was only one comment.

    Are they successful artful bloggers?

    I’m only making this statement because I have maybe .02 percentage of their followers. But I dwarf them all in my percentage of views, likes and comments.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Well, here’s the thing: when you have a few readers, the percentage of those readers that “read” your blog posts is huge. Actually, if you have, say, 50 followers, and you get 10 likes, most of those likes are not even from your followers, but from folks who stumbled upon your blog.

      In time, that percentage drops drastically. Why? Because you still get 7-8 likes from folks who stumble upon your blog, but now you’ve got thousands of followers. Lot of them binge read your content, lots of them don’t click that like button because they don’t think about it.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Sounds scientific but it the case in my analysis I don’t think so. I notice that there are a lot of binge clickers but not a lot of binge readers. Getting 20-30 clicks from one blogger the space of a minute

        Like

      2. Your analysis of 3 blogs that you use to rationalize that having fewer followers is better? Funny.

        Over time a lot of the accounts that follow you stop using WordPress, but they still appear as followers.

        Also, as you said, those who like a lot of posts just so you visit their blogs. They spike your views and likes a lot. I don’t even notice them, because they are irrelevant in terms of traffic.

        If I have a blog that only my mother, father, and best friend follow and get three likes and three comments every time I post something does that make me the best blogger who’s ever lived?

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Most of my likes are from followers. In fact, the majority are from the same pool of 20-30% of my bloggers, post after post. Whether it was 15 followers when I started in March or approaching 370 today. A small group, I know.
        And as my followers increase my numbers have gone up across the board week after week. I’ll just have to wait and see.
        Binge readers seem few and far between. Binge clickers who don’t even enter the post seem to be everywhere.

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.