Lessons Learned after One Year of The Art of Blogging

It’s been exactly one year since the first post was published on The Art of Blogging.

Over the course of 264 posts and 6,858 comments, the folks reading us grew from that frightening 0 to 27,158.

One article has been featured on WordPress Discover, which is always something that makes me proud.

To be honest, I wasn’t sure if such a niche blog would do well or not. Is blogging dead or dying? How many folks are interested in the principles and rules of proper blogging? How many blogs just like this one are there?

I started this blog because writing about the art of blogging gave me pleasure. It was interesting, it was fun. And it also helped you in your journey. These are, in my opinion, the secrets to successful blogging.

But I’ve learned so much more than just this. So, I’ve compiled a list of the 23 most important lessons learned in one year of The Art of Blogging.

  1. Your blog posts should help people solve a problem, it’s the most powerful way to keep them coming back. and
  2. Differentiate yourself. There are so many blogs out there that if you don’t stand out, you’ll get lost in the crowd.
  3. Blogging takes talent, effort, and patience. Only do it if you love to write and have something to say. Be prepared to invest a lot of time before seeing any serious returns, both in terms of readers and money.
  4. If you’re not sure a post is good, sit on it for a day. If you still aren’t convinced, delete it. A bad post is worse than no post.
  5. Write for your readers first. Create useful content that takes your readers on a journey.
  6. Content is king. Never spend too much time promoting your blog, engaging with other bloggers or your readers. Don’t get lost in the trenches of self-promotion. Content comes first. No content, no readers. Simple as that.
  7. You’ll inevitably run out of ideas after about 3-4 months, depending on how often you post. Do your best to stick it out and refrain from posting anything that’s absolutely lame. The inspiration does come back.
  8. You do have to network. You do have to promote. Failure to do this means you fail to gain any real momentum.
  9. Adapt, overcome, improvise. Your readers will always provide you with more than enough feedback to make your blog better.
  10. Do not try to impress anyone, no even yourself. Those posts rarely get much attention.
  11. Headlines and intros can make or break a blog post.
  12. Formatting matters. A lot.
  13. Replying to those who take the time to comment, even if it’s a simple thank you, impacts your traffic by at least 50%.
  14. Social media is a great way to bring more readers.
  15. Tags and categories. A clean design. First impressions matter.
  16. Keep it simple. Write in a conversational style, this seems to do the trick. Fancy words often alienate readers.
  17. Always ask yourself what good does you writing that piece will do in this world.
  18. It’s often hardest just at the start. Then it gets easier, you get better, you get tougher.
  19. Enthusiasm and motivation do not last. Being committed always does.
  20. Winning is not that important, it’s the desire to win.
  21. Have fun. Write the kind of stuff that makes your heart smile. Your readers will love you for it.
  22. Write the truth, even if your fingers shake against the keyboard.
  23. Be brave. If you aren’t, do your best to act like you are.

These are some of the lessons I’ve learned in one year of The Art of Blogging. The most important ones. The ones I could remember about.

Now, it’s Easter here in Romania, and I’m also celebrating one year of our blog.

So here’s my question for today:

What is the most important lesson you’ve learned about blogging?

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48 thoughts on “Lessons Learned after One Year of The Art of Blogging

  1. Thanks for this round up. Although a small and bon-monetize d blig, I have found 4, 17, and 22 especially true. Though I still wonder, those commenting aside, how many visiting or even liking a post are actually reading. No way to know, I guess. I get followers who then vanish and assume they just want to gather followers themselves.

    Liked by 7 people

  2. Felicitari! Hristos a Inviat! Am invatat ca trebuie sa mergi pe drumul tau, sa muncesti si sa te bucuri de fiecare moment in care blogul iti este apreciat😊

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Yes. Don’t. It’s tricky, it’s not particularly worth it, and odds are that no one will care. The talent required to write about your every day life and make it worth it means you must have a truly extraordinary life (why most folks are obsessed with the lives of the rich and famous) or a particular way of writing about it…

      Liked by 4 people

  3. Congratulations on your brilliant first year. I agree with keeping posts conversational, they are the blogs that hold my attention. I think being consistent helps, too, whether it’s once a week, fortnight or month. Best of luck with the second year.

    Liked by 5 people

  4. I just started a home business related to health and wellness and literally just started blogging yesterday. Being so new to this community I haven’t really learned anything yet but am sure I will over the next year. I am looking forward to starting this journey!

    Liked by 5 people

  5. Many helpful points in this post! Thanks! For me, this doesn’t always hold true:
    “If you’re not sure a post is good, sit on it for a day. If you still aren’t convinced, delete it. A bad post is worse than no post.”
    Sometimes a post I am uncertain about, turns out to be well appreciated by my readers. And a post I thought was great, turns out to be a dud!

    Liked by 5 people

  6. Congratulations I’ve watched you grow, your sincerity your open and honest conversations your very human interactions and determination has enriched our lives. Thank you 🌹

    Liked by 5 people

  7. She was walking through the desert, carefully carrying a handful of seeds, trying to find a place for them to grow. But the desert was dry and hostile, dune after dune…

    After a long while she came to the sea.
    Entranced, she stood there for a time, looking out over the unending waves, wondering – where to, next?
    And then, she heard a voice. “I can help you to build a ship, great and strong,” it quietly told her. “To sail far away, across the horizon, to a land where your seeds may grow and flower.”

    She looked down at her hand. At the seeds she had carried for so long. And then she smiled… 🙂

    Dear Cristian,
    The most important lesson I have learned about blogging, is: it is much better to find a teacher/mentor, than to figure out everything yourself! 😉
    Or – keep it simple, yes? 🙂
    And you know what? I feel so lucky I happened to read your blog!! 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Happy Easter, Cristian!!
    And – congratulations with your success! 🙂 🙂
    May you always inspire people – and feel inspired in turn! 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

  8. Great post! I just started blogging and it is mostly about new health and wellness products that I have discovered. I don’t expect to write anything especially profound but you do give a lot of good, practical advice which I appreciate.

    Liked by 4 people

  9. I think for me the most important thing is to make time. I find it difficult to write after I come back home as I am tired and at the weekends I am usually out and about to meet friends. So I find it hard to put content together that also makes sense. When I write after work the progress is slow and sometimes when I edit the content, the stuff I wrote the night before or so does not seem to make a lot of sense all of a sudden. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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