This is YOUR Wake-Up Call

Stop lying. To yourself. To others. In the comments section of your blog. On other people’s blogs. In your about page. Stop lying.

“I don’t care if people read my stuff or not.”

“I blog for me, myself, and I.”

Lies.

If that were true, you’d be writing in a notepad. Or several. Hiding them away under your bed or in a closet. But you’re on the world wide web for a reason, and that reason is to be read.

But no one reads your blogs, so you have to lie. And I’d use that terrible, terrible cliche that the road to hell is paved with lies and good intentions and adverbs, but the truth is that lies are the bricks that help build hell here on earth. A kind of hell that you have to live with for the rest of your life.

So, yeah, stop lying to yourself.

The first step in solving any problem is recognizing you have one.

You have no readers. So what? I didn’t have any readers when I first started blogging.

But you have to admit that you are writing in the hopes of someone reading your words.

We all do.

And it’s okay.

Don’t settle.

Average always has an excuse (or several) as to why it’s not great. Great is too busy being humbled by the struggle to even have an opinion about its own greatness.

Most bloggers are afraid. They are afraid they’re not as good as they have to be in order to have the success they want.

In other words, they’re not who they want to be, and this fills them with dread.

The thing is, you can always become. Better.

Do not settle. Do not make excuses. Do not feel sorry for yourself. Do not find reasons as to why someone else is succeeding and you’re not.

If it were easy…

Everybody would be doing it.

Yet, somehow, they don’t.

Most folks who purchase gym memberships never go to the gym more than a few times. That’s such a sure thing that the pricing of memberships is influenced by it.

Now, let me ask you: how many people do you think give up blogging altogether even after having enrolled in one of my programs?


Be honest with yourself. Tell yourself where you want to go, and write down what you need in order to make that journey a reality.

Oh, and don’t forget to enjoy the journey, because the destination won’t be as exciting as you can make it appear inside your head.

It’s okay to want readers. It’s okay to want to monetize your blog. It’s okay to want to sell stuff to strangers over the Internet. It’s okay to want views, comments, and shares.

And, truth be told, if you don’t have the guts to admit this to yourself, if you do not ask, what kind of answer do you think you’ll get?

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41 thoughts on “This is YOUR Wake-Up Call

  1. I love this. You are absolutely right about its okay if you have no readers etc. Things happen in time and you have to continue to push through. I don’t understand why someone would want to lie to themselves about anything. People tend to find the lie easier to deal with I guess. I will admit that I really don’t have readers and I’m okay with that, but I do know that I will eventually get there. Having readers, likes, comments can all mess with your mind and have you question yourself. I choose to push through until I get where I want to be.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I have the opposite problem. I know my stuff is “good enough” — I’ve been writing professionally and “semi-professionally” (i.e., same quality, no pay) for over two decades. (Yes, I’m old.) For me, it’s a matter of having enough patience to develop a readership. In the meantime, I do treat it as writing “for myself”: otherwise, I’d not do it!
    I’m observing some patterns so far. I’ve linked my blog posts to my LinkedIn feed, and I get a few readers from there, for both the music reviews and book reviews. I also have received some attention from other WordPress bloggers, which is actually quite gratifying, but, oddly, for the book reviews, which aren’t really the point (though I certainly enjoy pounding them out!).

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I blog for the sake of community–being part of it, participating in it.

    I enjoy reading blogs, and I learn a lot from the comments others leave on my posts.

    Don’t know if I care about the number of people who read me, but I certainly like that I have made so many friends over the years, some of whom I have met in real life, and who I bond with on social media, as well.

    For me, blogging is about people, always will be.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. That’s me too, Damyanti. I read many more blog posts than I write. There is always something fascinating, inspiring, creative, etc. to find here on WordPress and it’s good to learn more about the people behind the stories. I admit that I do feel warm and fuzzy when others acknowledge my posts, but mainly for the contact and feeling of belonging that it brings.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. We don’t all kid ourselves, Cristian!
    I am the worst blogging failure I have ever seen.
    After 2 years and 173 posts I am speaking into stony silence every week
    (apart from one kind soul, who keeps my comment section alive on her own).
    I can hardly bear to look at my stats, and actually get anxiety symptoms each Monday before I log in (to see how a post has done).
    I feel utterly crushed, but go on writing as well as I can, without hope.
    Blogging has brought me to despair.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Ken,

      You are consistent and perseverant. Those are great traits to have.

      Now, there’s also the fact that you must change your strategy. Experiment.

      What are some blogs that are similar to yours, but enjoy success?

      Also, as you share poetry, maybe a different social platform my yield better results. I am thinking of Atticus and all the other poets who found success on Instagram.

      If you change nothing, nothing changes, and banging your head on a wall in the hope of it turning into a door is not a viable long term strategy.

      Also, do not underestimate the importance of networking with fellow bloggers. What other blogs do you read? How often do you comment on those blogs?

      Striving to make friends in the blogging community is another great way to find readers.

      Also, search for websites that showcase poetry or bloggers willing to interview you.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for the response, Cristian!
        In my case everything gets spoilt by the severity of chronic illness: It takes me several days working on a post, afterwards I feel too burnt out to do much for a few days then it’s time to start work on the next one.
        I lack the energy to network much, and am not on other platforms.
        (I would have paid for reblogs long ago if I wasn’t paranoid about using my credit card online!)
        Thank you.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Then post once every two weeks. Spend one week on networking.

        Networking is crucial, and it could also be fun and inspire your poetry.

        As for using a credit card online: I use a different card for online purchases. One that I do not keep money on, and only trasfer money on that card when I need to make a purchase.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Your replies are excellent and very useful, Cristian!
        (I did not have time to reply yesterday.)
        (Had not heard about poetry on instagram.)
        On many points I agree with you completely, and have been thinking along similar lines.
        The reason I’ve felt tied to my current unsuccessful method is rooted in fear.
        Having a potentially life-threatening illness that is incurable and progressive and may soon require drugs (such as morphine) which interfere with mental clarity: has kept me focussed on putting as much old work as possible online while I’m still able, since time is running out for me.
        That is why I try so hard to keep blogging rather than diversify and network, which might get the stats up.
        However, when I’ve got through more of the backlog and feel able to relax a little, I plan to follow much of your good advice, for which I am grateful.

        (Frustratingly, I can’t seem to find an “e-card” for online use in the UK, at present. )

        Thank you, once again!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Hit home pretty hard for me. I’m in the middle of building up my writing presence and am fixing to launch a Patreon page for my story writing. It’s scary.

    But I’ve put off doing my dreams for so long but I simply can’t do that to myself anymore. I really want to find an audience and I do want my work read. Hopefully, that comes with time and persistence. Thanks for the post.

    Liked by 2 people

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