Donald Trump’s Guide to Blogging

Donald John Trump. POTUS. Businessman. Television personality. Controversial figure, before and after becoming the most powerful man on the planet.

Love him or hate him, but we all know his name, we all know what he’s about. His brand, so to speak.

But how does he do it?

Why do we know so much about The Donald? How did he manage to be everywhere?

And can we use his methods to grow our blogs and find a larger audience, possibly write better articles?

Well, let’s find out together, shall we?1. The Bully’s Definition of Authority

In a way, Donald Trump is a bully. Define self-confidence any way you want, but the guy knows what he wants, goes after it, and usually gets it.

And the rather shocking bit is that he does not seem to know much about the things he’s after.

Because the truth about human nature is that we often follow the expert. The guy who clearly knows what he’s doing.

But at the same time, we also follow the guy who just pretends to know what he’s doing. Or thinks he knows. Even when we know for sure he’s wrong.

In other words, who is most certain will always influence the other. It’s not about skill, it’s only about self-confidence. We either follow the expert or the bully. It does not matter.

2. Leverage

Why We Want You to Be Rich: Two Men, One Message is a book about personal finance, co-authored by Donald Trump and Robert Kiyosaki, released in 2006.

That’s one of the things Donald Trump has done to gain access to a certain audience he wouldn’t normally have access to.

It’s incredible that bloggers somehow think that if they keep posting one blog post after another, somehow someone someday will find them and make them Internet famous…

And they spend their entire “blogging career” with 72 followers, 15 of which are their mother, their father, and a bunch of cousins who live three states away.

You must play the game.

Find the top 10 bloggers in your niche, and get to work. Study them, read their posts, analyze how they title their posts, how long their posts are, how they use subheads, how they open a blog and how they end one.

After you’ve done that, start leaving comments. Genuine stuff, not generic. Write like an actual human being who has read the article and has formulated an opinion.

Build rapport with those bloggers. They should know who you are, they should like you, and most importantly, they should respect you (and your opinions).

Then it’s time to leverage those relationships:

  • Ask them if you can guest blog on their blogs
  • Ask them if they’d like to be interviewed by you on your blog (if it all turns out okay, then odds are they’ll at least mention the interview to their readers)
  • Ask them if it’s okay to link to their blog in one of your articles (maybe they’ll also link back to something of yours they enjoyed doing)

This is the game you must play. You want something you never had? Find one person who has that, and get to know them. Odds are you’ll be able to figure out how they got there in the first place.

3. Be polarizing

Let me ask you something. When was the last time you laughed your heart out? Like uncontrollably, way too loud. In front of other folks. Hmm?

Most people have never done that. Social conditioning makes it mandatory to fit in.

Well, sorry to break it to you, but great bloggers, the really popular ones, are polarizing as f*ck.

The more polarizing, the more popular…

What I mean by this?

Some folks want to kill you, while others adore you.

Here’s the interesting deal about blogging: is not that much a numbers game, as it’s a game of trust, loyalty, and admiration.

The articles that get shared are the ones that people love a lot, the ones that elicit strong emotional reactions.

You could do better with a thousand followers who are obsessed with you and buy every single one of your products, or are begging you to take money from you/sending you free stuff, than you could with a hundred thousand followers who barely care enough to read your lukewarm content once in a while.

Yes, folks. Lukewarm is no good. Trying to please everyone, not being too loud, not saying what you really think and how you want to say it. Or when. Or how often…

Try to develop an over-the-top attitude, to be certain of your expertise, to be a bit cocky or extravagant.

Be Like The Donald?

You may hate his guts. Or you may admire him. Or you may even think that his formula for success could never translate well to your blogging venture.

But the fact of the matter is that it won’t kill you to give it a try.


Just a quick note to let you know that there’s one last spot in the 0 to 5K Program. And it’s heavily discounted. 

Click here to read about it

That’s about it.

Advertisements

19 thoughts on “Donald Trump’s Guide to Blogging

  1. The fact that in this day of political correctness there is no place to have an opinion unless it is agreed upon by those who can’t handle answers that require them to be equal. If by chance you disagree with someone the best advice is to devise a method of presenting your side, and then stand behind it without fear of defeat.

    Liked by 5 people

  2. I almost completely avoided reading this blog. The fact that you brought a controversial political figure into your writing was incredibly risky and made me completely warey.

    Quite frankly, I am just so sick to death of hearing his name multiple times EVERYDAY!!! There just doesn’t seem to be any sacred ground where he is off limits for discussion. Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, Instagram, WordPress, the local, national and international news (in all media types), and the list is unending.

    You really risked losing readership from people for and against him. I hope you don’t. I’m still here after all.

    I did agree with what you said about people following those that are sure of themselves, whether they know what they are doing or not. There are many examples of this in current events and in history.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. There’s good and bad in every single person we know. We accept this in those around us, yet sometimes we fail seeing in the people we don’t personally know. And it is easier this way. But it’s also a way of objectifying someone.

      We can learn a lot from every single human being, regardless of their faults. We just got to keep an open mind.

      Liked by 3 people

  3. I love the overall point to be risky. My father always told us “It does not matter what I think, but what do you think? That’s what matters.” Smart man taught us to have an opinion, back it up and take the risk. This is re-assurance to that. Do you want to be liked or do you want to be heard? Every opinion counts and fresh ideas come from discussion and evaluation.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. 1. I don’t consider angry Trump tweets as a model to successfully blog.

    2.If you never bother to read, yourself, ala
    Trump , then why bother to make opinions you don’t really understand.

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.