Commenting on Other Blogs: What Works, What Doesn’t

Does commenting on other blogs bring traffic?

Yes. Kinda.

Can it be used as an effective strategy?

No.

And yes.

It depends on how you do it.

Some people do it horrendously wrong.

Let’s take a look.

What doesn’t work

If your smart move is to leave comments on the posts of larger blogs in your niche just to get a few clicks, you should stop. You could get more traffic from a great blog post than months of that type of comment strategy.

And, if you think about it, if your blog sucks, there’s no reason to attract a few “curiosity clicks” anyway. What’s going to make them stick around after the click?

Nothing.

Plus, the root motivation for those curiosity clicks is often bad to begin with. The nature of the game makes it that way.

Many new bloggers approach commenting on other blogs like this: They try to be the first or second comment on every post of a larger blog. They do this because those positions in the comment stream get the most click-throughs.

The problem is, in the rush for “first,” the resulting comments are often incoherent and banal. Sometimes it’s quite clear you didn’t read the post, or missed the point of the post.

So any curiosity clicks are usually motivated by “I wonder just how bad this bozo’s blog is going to be?” It’s true… lame blogs are entertainment for the rest of us.

So, is commenting on other blogs not worthy it?

Nope. In fact, you can actually attract that traffic you want via a smart commenting strategy.

How Comments Can Lead to Real Traffic

Look, the first rule of blogging is to write great content. Without it, there’s not much point in receiving a lot of attention anyway.

And the one rule of blog comments is… plot twist… building relationships.

Shocking, I know.

Think about it. It’s no secret that many of the people who comment on blogs are also bloggers. They simply have more motivation to take the time to comment. Just like waiters being the ones who usually give the most generous tips to other waiters.

They understand the struggle.

How do I know all this?

Well, in my six years of blogging, I did try a lot of different things. Most of them didn’t work. All of them, with the exception of creating great, engaging content, and building meaningful relationships with other bloggers, that is.

If you actively participate in the community that is build around certain blogs, and you do it without expecting anything in return, then you’ll get significant traffic from fellow bloggers.

What do most people do?

They add links to their posts, they urge others to read their blogs, they ask for feedback, help, a bit of promotion. I rarely even approve such comments.

It’s like being betrayed.

Here I am, spending 2 hours to write the best blog post that I can, and all someone else can say is to beg me to take a look at their blog? Seriously? Are we, what? Five?

Sometimes I think that the most difficult thing is for us to act like actual human beings. No spam, no ass-kissing the blog owner, no trolling, no stupid comments that have nothing to do with the topic of the post.

It’s not rocket science. It really isn’t.

Can’t I be First and Fabulous?

Yes, you can. But you need to ask yourself if it’s worth spending that much time being on the lookout for new posts.

Truth be told, the older I get, the less tolerance I have for getting sidetracked by various activities. I find that the more I focus on content development, the better the content turns out, the more people engage with that content.

But that’s just my opinion.

So, what do you think?

It’s also no secret that the readers of this blog are a cut above the rest of the crowd. So please leave an exquisite, meaningful comment.

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44 thoughts on “Commenting on Other Blogs: What Works, What Doesn’t

  1. Irony accepted that this is the first comment on this post; I don’t think I would ever rush to leave a ‘first!’ comment. It’s completely pointless – what do you want, a medal? It makes me laugh when people do it on Instagram, particularly with celebs… what do they think, that Beyoncé is sat there waiting to introduce the first commenter to the illuminati?!

    Liked by 8 people

  2. I never take the time to be the first comment on any of the blogs I follow. I only try to comment on a blog post if I feel like I can contribute to the conversation the post is talking about or just to let the person know if I enjoyed their post how I felt about it. But that’s really it, I never try to link my blog posts in comments so others will read them or anything.

    I actually don’t see too many people who act the way your describing on any of the blogs I follow, which is probably a good thing because I know I’d definitely be annoyed with that myself if I saw it on my blog.

    Liked by 6 people

  3. Firstly, I want to tell you that I was literally blown away the first time I saw your blog. That is not ass kissing, it’s the honest truth.

    Most of the time, I don’t leave comments on blogs and I probably should start. Not to generate traffic, but to build relationships, like you said.

    A lot of the time, I just don’t know what to say and I don’t want to just say something for the sake of saying something. There isn’t much, if any, point to that. Just as there isn’t any point in being the first commenter.

    Over the past few days, I’ve been thinking a lot about the points you’ve made in your posts that I have had the chance to read so far. This is another point I will think about. Thanks 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you for your nice words.

      Well, the idea is to offer people as many ideas as possible. Some of them they might implement, some they may not. After all, there’s a big difference between what we know we should do and what we decide to do. Should doesn’t always become a must.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Most welcome 🙂 Thanks for the ideas.

        I know what you mean about the difference and the decision. Some of it ‘should’ be common sense, but common sense has become uncommon.

        Having said that, most of the points you make are things that people haven’t considered before and probably wouldn’t have if you hadn’t brought it up.

        One of the comments on my main blog (not wordpress) was: “Congratulation! This is hardly the most boring, self-indulgent blog!”

        To which I replied: “Congratulations! This is hardly the most boring, self-indulgent comment!”

        Really, what more could I have said to that?

        Alas, I probably didn’t need to reply to it at all.

        Liked by 2 people

  4. I like what you said here. I actually never thought in terms of commenting to generate traffic, at least not on a conscious level. Most of the blogs I follow or comment on I do so because I feel like I am “talking” to and supporting a friend and I’ve noticed that those who respond to me sound as though they feel the same.
    Most of my blogs tend to be triggered by an idea triggered by something others may have blogged about, is that okay?

    Liked by 4 people

  5. The last sentence made me laugh. Nice touch. I’m quite new to blogging so I’m surprised people comment to get others to read their blogs. I haven’t seen such comments so far but I guess it’s because they don’t get approved anymore. Anyway, I only comment on a post if I have something to say related to the post. Thanks for all the helpful tips.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I’m not a professional. I’m not here for money or for popularity. I’m here for connections and for self-improvement and for the laughs and for the rough moments that need to be put into words for the sake of my internal survival. I’m here because I love to write what so many people tend to hold inside of them. I think that by simply being real, the growth can come. I’ve been told so many times to “leave my link” in comments sections and I just don’t feel REAL doing that. If someone is interested in my words, they can come check me out I mean it’s really THAT fucking simple. Genuine comments, and genuine content, will help build genuine relationships with other writers and things just grow, genuinely. I’d rather have 100 actual readers and friends, than 10,000 fake commercial followers who’ve never so much as clicked on a post. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I comment on various post if those have really a good content to read or I can relate too. I feel commenting on other blogs helps you to get connected with that blogger and this shows that the post is actually read and well appreciated.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. First of all I don’t understand why should any body rush to become more popular,to have more followers,to have more likes and to go on commenting each and every blog post they come across.
    This is the most sickening behaviour of majority of us,because everybody wants have short cut to popularity,forgetting that respect is to be commanded and not demanded.
    What is your opinion about some of the blogs asking people to leave the link and also reblog to share the message ?
    I felt funny when you said…there are people waiting only to rush to post comment first …as if ‘ First come…first served’ philosophy.I feel sorry for these souls. ( reminds me of customers waiting at the doors of Malls to be opened for ‘sales’)
    I could not agree more with your advice about the ‘comments’….what works…what doen’t work.
    Finally some body ,from somewhere,sometime may like the blog post depending upon the similarity of the wavelength.So till that time one must be patient.
    Thank you for giving an opportunity Cristian Mihai,you are truly inspiring!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. It’s “slimey” if you think of it! Nobody enjoys having that kind of “brown-nosing”… Better to just read and comment what is providing benefit or just hit like if you don’t actually have something that is worth saying. Not much has changed from previous years though; I remember those in school who really had no clue what was going on, but always had plenty to say, because they piggy-backed off of others. I agree with you- “LESS tolerance” for them as of late. More importantly, I am happy to read your blog because I learn a great deal from you.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I say many are desperate to make this blog thing work. Me I have started this plan and many who talk about keywords, SEO stuff and… but I agree that the best way to get fans is to be one yourself. I never thought of being first but I just comment and even if it’s a sentence that let’s them know I love your color. I believe that it’s as simple as that. I view commenting as a way to meet people and I don’t know about you but when someone likes my art I want to know who they are and so I click the picture. In some cases when I notice it’s a repeat I will follow the blog.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. You are absolutely right! It means so much to me when someone takes out the time to read and comment on one of my posts, so I would be very disappointed if the comment was just incoherent gibberish meant to get a few clicks. I’ve recently took up the initiative to start commenting more instead of just reading a post and it has led to a lot more interaction with other bloggers. It’s nice getting tips and talking about shared interests.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. This is a really great topic. I was one of those bloggers that would do the same “tricks” and it didn’t work out. Now, I’m focus on trying to make my content more meaningful and consistent which seems to be doing well for me now. I only try to comment on posts that really grab me and I donor look for return favors either. Great post, makes me feel like I’m finally doing something right!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I’ve built a relationship already with a writing prompt group, and that spiked my views, visitors, and comments in a way nothing else had. But the best part is that I have new blogging friends, and I regularly read their posts even when we aren’t linking up for the Friday. I really enjoy reading your blog posts as I’m getting back to blogging after a few years. Thanks for the advice. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Stunning! Beautiful! Great photos!

    Just joking.

    Sometimes comments (mine or others’) spark a new post I want to write. These are the best sorts of comments. Cross-contamination comments.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Honestly, I LOVE feedback on my blogs, even if it’s simply someone saying, I understand where you are coming from or what do you mean by that or this? I even like it when someone challenges my thinking or perspective on a blog comment, because, even if it offends me in the moment, it makes me think and it makes me clarify and… it might even just help me open my mind to new perspective or way of thinking!

    That being said, I do not like to ASK people for feedback very much, because then they feel obligated. I HAVE asked for feedback, but only with close friends and I get very few responses that way. I do not comment on others blogs just to get them to comment on mine either! I read and if I find content I like, then I respond to that. Sometimes, the comment might be vague, as in, very pretty poem, or nice perspective, but sometimes, when it hits me just right, I comment more in depth!

    Also, when I find a blogger who’s content resonates with me, I tend to read every single blog they have, even if I have to go back several months to read to them all and I’m one of those people who want to read everything “in order”. That gets hard sometimes!

    What I do not like, is “likes” with no feedback… I don’t know why that drives me insane, I want to know WHY you like it! But, then again, I find that sometimes, when I am reading in order and it’s not extraordinary, but it’s good, I will like, kind of to keep my place, lol! I’ve had people just go to my page and like every single blog and leave no feedback and I hate that, haha!

    Like

  16. I’m working on the second one, but I struggle with building relationships online. I think I am uncertain about who I should put the time into. If it is like you say, and building relationships help both blogs (seems pretty straight forward) what do I do if the other person does not reciprocate?
    Does my worrying about that make me too selfish with my time? Probably.
    Thank you for the straightforward post that helps us beginners gain a better understanding of how to be polite to the rest of the blogging community.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. “Curiosity clicks ” is a term I have not come across before. However it is something that I am guilty of. Whenever someone pays my humble little blog some attention (comment, like or follow) I always click on their link to see what kind of blog they have. I also check out their about page.
    I find that the comments and replies to be very interesting as they can spark a debate that can be as useful as the blog post itself.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. This is a good post. I’ve honestly been trying to figure out how to grow my reader base. I guess this article points out that it’s a heart issue (do I want clicks or to form a relationship with said blogger?)

    This article has actually given me even more questions to ponder.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Interesting post. I’m completely new to the world of blogging (2 months) and I do try and comment to blogs I’m currently following if I feel like I have something to say. I have noticed recently that I have been “first comment” but it’s not because I want to be “first”. I couldn’t care less about being first it’s about timing of when I read posts and the fact that some of the blogs I follow may not have many comments on their posts regardless. 🙄 Like you mentioned above commenting can be great for building relationships with other bloggers which is my goal. 🤷🏾‍♀️

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I just love reading and writing,apart from other commitments I have got,I do this blog thing for fun,who ever wants to read yes am grateful and if people don’t read that’s fine I keep it moving,no ass kissing here

    Liked by 2 people

  21. I see what you did there!

    But seriously, I couldn’t agree more. I’m not a big commenter on other people’s blogs, and even less on bigger ones, where my comment will probably be buried in minutes. My only reasons to comment are:

    1- I have something to offer back as a reply to a question asked by the post;
    2- I like the post in general;
    3- I like the person who wrote the post and want to interact with them.

    Which all end up leading to meaningful comments in which I want to offer something, not take. Generosity is a big thing within the blogging world, and people need to learn that it’s by giving that you get something back, not by asking or taking and giving nothing in return.

    Liked by 2 people

  22. I agree.. To get overly sidetracked on commenting on too many blogs seems to mismanage my time from focusing on writing quality content for my own creations.

    Like

  23. I’m a new kid on the blogging scene and have been reading away about not to get more traffic. Something didn’t feel right about some of the suggestions I read. Your thoughts resonate with me. Thanks for putting this up.:)

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I love your content and have only been skimming your page for 15 minutes! Love this line: “Here I am, spending 2 hours to write the best blog post that I can, and all someone else can say is to beg me to take a look at their blog? Seriously? Are we, what? Five?”

    Liked by 2 people

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